Last Chance to See “Edible City: A Delicious Journey” at MOHAI

MOHAI’s ten-month long exploration of food and its place in Seattle’s economy and culture closes Sept. 10. If you haven’t seen it, do yourself a favor and stop by. Then again, you who have already enjoyed it may want to get another look at the history of Seattle’s tastes and innovations in food production and distribution.

Seattle food culture is rich, unique, and distinguished. From the oyster middens and spear fishing of its Native American peoples to the farmers markets and award winning restaurants of today, people in Seattle have sought greatĀ eats and have learned to capitalize on the riches that abound here.

This exhibit touches on many of the foods Seattleites of all ethnicities cherish. We learn of their history and the myriad ways we use this plethora of good things to eat. There are sections of the exhibit that explain how we’ve collected or harvested the wild foods as well as the farmed. Sure there are sections on salmon, morel mushrooms, huckleberries, oysters, cherries and so many more raw ingredients, but you’ll also learn about the industries that have grown up around our foods both wild and farmed.

Fascinating, too, is the story of the innovative food culture that developed right here in Seattle. Starbucks anyone? Canned salmon anyone? Five star restaurants anyone?

I would say this exhibit is a tasty treat, but I dare not lest you groan and throw tomatoes (locally grown of course) at me.

Through Sept. 10 at the Museum of History & Industry, 800 Terry Ave. N., Seattle, 206 324-1126 or mohai.org

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