“The Legend of Georgia McBride” at ACT

What’s a fella to do? His darling wife’s pregnant. His act as an Elvis impersonator is going nowhere. They need money. Would you believe he finds his fame and fortune as a drag queen? It may sound like an absurd concept, but it makes a dynamite show, and ACT and Director David Bennett seem to have found just the right actors and costumes to make it zing.

Adam Standley as Casey, the failed Elvis interpreter, reluctantly puts on the bra and girdle, slips into the dress and wig and finds a new life for himself when all seems lost. Of course he can’t do it alone. His guide and mentor in this metamorphosis is Miss Tracy Mills played with panache by Seattle’s well-loved Timothy McCuen Piggee. Miss. Tracy is just about as fey as they come. She knows exactly how to move her hips, put on her makeup, and cross her legs. She can lip sync with perfection, and is one sharp individual who knows how to create a success.

Standley, reluctant though he may be to make the transition, turns himself into quite a presentable babe. He sashays with grace in the highest of high heels and wiggles his hips with the best of them. Meanwhile, he’s afraid to tell his pregnant wife exactly what role he plays at the nightspot where his Elvis didn’t quite make it. By the end of the play, she enthusiastically embraces his success.

These actors are indeed awfully good, and their costumes by Pete Rush and wigs by Dennis Milam Bensie are unforgettable. Sixteen wigs in all are used in the show, most of them bouffant masterpieces and in a variety of colors. And costumes! Think sequins and satin; think ruffles, think over the top. And for those of us who aren’t familiar with the underthings that help make the sexual transitions appear real, this show is a learning experience.

Playwright Matthew Lopez has created a delightful confection. ACT has given it a topnotch production.

Through July 2 at ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., Seattle, (206 292-7676 or www.acttheatre.org.)

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